Sonja K. Eliason
Reflections of an evolutionary biologist

Beliefs, Ideas, Opinions

Long-Distance to Quarantine: 5 Surprisingly Similar Relationship Lessons

5 surprisingly similar relationship lessons I found were consistent across being long-distance and being in quarantine with my partner.

By

Sonja K. Eliason

April 22, 2020

Beliefs, Ideas, Opinions

Megxit and the Legacy of American Individualism

Reactions to the departure of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle from royal life run from furious feelings of betrayal to reluctant understanding and, of course, complete indifference. But how is the couple's choice reflective of a deeper tension between Britain and America: the role of individualism in government?

By

Sonja K. Eliason

January 26, 2020

Biology

More than a hundred years later, is Coronavirus the next Spanish Flu?

The spread and death roll of the new coronavirus has some people claiming that it is poised to become the next Spanish Flu—a global pandemic that began in 1918 and killed up to 40 million people. But what was the 1918 Flu, and why is the comparison important?

By

Sonja K. Eliason

January 26, 2020

Biology

InnoVAXation

Vaccines prevent 2-3 million deaths per year, but there is a lot of work still to be done on providing safe, effective protection against infectious diseases. What are examples of innovation going on in the biological mechanisms of vaccines today, and what implications do they have for infectious diseases and beyond?

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Sonja K. Eliason

January 9, 2020

Biology

Plague was around for millennia before epidemics took hold – and the way people lived might be what protected them

Recent paleogenetics research reveals that plague has been with us for millennia longer: Ancient DNA (aDNA) from the bacteria was recovered from human skeletons as old as 4,900 years. This means people were contracting and dying from plague at least 3,000 years before there’s any archaeological or historical evidence for an epidemic. How did people survive the disease for thousands of years? The answer may be lifestyle.

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Sonja K. Eliason

November 7, 2019

Biology

I'm immune to HIV. Having access to that knowledge is a problem.

In November 2018, He Jiankui announced to the international scientific community that he had edited the embryos of twin baby girls to be immune to HIV via the inactivation of CCR5. I am one of the natural carriers of this mutation. But the science surrounding the mutation is complex, and many individuals are not provided with the resources to understand their own DNA results.

By

Sonja K. Eliason

October 16, 2019

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